Cedar Elm

 In
Cedar Elm

Ulmus crassifolia
Olmo, Scrub Elm, Lime Elm, Fall Elm
45

50 feet
30

40 feet
Southern U.S. to Mexico
  • Central Texas
  • Texas
  • Full Sun
  • Part Sun/Shade
  • Low
  • Birds

About This Plant

Sun or shade; deciduous. Cedar elm is tall, tough, and adaptable as to soil type; its small, rough leaves, twining branches, and oval canopy are easily recognized throughout south-central Texas. No other local elm flowers and sets seed in the fall; the leaves provide nice yellow fall color. Cedar elm tolerates both thin rocky soils and poorly drained clay, as well as urban conditions and root compaction; it is often employed as a street tree.

Maintenance

Pruning helps to maintain a healthy specimen, especially around cars and close to buildings; cedar elm tends to drop branches during high winds. Pruning cuts should only be made at a bud or branch; in general, focus on minimizing the number of dead, damaged, or rubbing limbs and removing co-dominant branching. As with any tree, remove no more than 25% of the canopy during any five-year cycle. In general, leave the upper 2/3 of the crown uncut; avoid removing more than the lowest third of the tree in a single pruning period. Mulch with about 2″ of woodchips or pine bark wherever possible. (The mulched area should be six feet at minimum.)

Features

Plant Type:
Large Tree
Size:
45-50' H, 30-40' W
Sunlight Requirements:
Full Sun, Part Sun/Shade
Soil Types:
Clay, Sandy, Thin
Wildlife:
Birds, Butterflies, Butterfly Larvae
Flower Color:
Brown, Green, Red
Bloom Time:
November
Freeze Hardy:
Yes
Invasive:
No
Caution:
Cedar elms are one of the trees most likely to suffer damage from high winds.
Coupon Eligible:
No

This plant goes well with

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